Staying healthy during a lockdown

A global crisis such as Coronavirus (COVID-19) can affect us all in ways that most of us couldn’t have imagined. When gyms close and team sports are discouraged due to social distancing, looking after our physical and psychological health becomes increasingly difficult, and with more of our clients working from home at improvised workstations, many begin to feel the strain.

Set up a work/desk station

For those who don’t have a workstation set up at home, it can be tempting to sit on the sofa with the computer on your lap, but trying to sit at a proper desk instead, or even the kitchen table is much better for your posture.

Take regular breaks

Without the usual commute to work or the disruptions that the office provides, you can often get more done. It’s not unusual however to find yourself sitting at the desk for hours on end without a break. It might help to set a timer to ensure you take regular breaks. Even just two minutes walking around the house every half hour can help.

Go outside (if you can) and at a safe distance

With a fast changing situation and government advice being updated daily, practicing social distancing does not mean that you have to stay in the house constantly (unless you have symptoms or are in a vulnerable group and have been told to self-isolate). Unless government advice changes, take a short walk outside for exercise in a way that reduces social contact. Avoid mass gatherings, avoid public transport and keep a safe distance of at two metres from others.

Use your home as a gym

Whilst in isolation and stuck at home, try to keep active in as many ways as you can. Walk up and down the stairs several times, get out in to the garden (if you have one) or find a new exercise video on YouTube. Better yet, make your own exercise videos and upload them to your clinic social media channels!

Keep in touch

When we think of keeping fit, we often focus on our physical health but may lose track of our psychological wellbeing. The flip side of social distancing is social isolation, but modern technology such as video calls (Skype, WhatsApp, Facetime etc), text messaging, social media and telephone calls make it easier than ever to keep in contact with loved ones without the need for real-time face-to-face gatherings. Even if you consider yourself to be fine, is there someone you know that might feel isolated and could do with a phone call?

Set up a routine

Maintaining a routine can help you keep on top of feelings of anxiety and frustration. Write a list of all the things that you want to achieve by the end of the week (and sticking to it) might be part of that.

Unprecedented events that unfold will undoubtedly affect us all and change the way we view ourselves, our lives and the future. However, if we remain calm and work together to support each other as a community, we can and will prevail through difficult times.



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